Monthly Archives: March 2018

Inquiry learning: Where is the science? Where is the social studies?

I am concerned that too many children reach secondary school lacking flexibility in thinking and interest in ideas. My philosophy is for children to become intensely involved in learning based on the interaction between the cognitive and the affective (which … Continue reading

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Mathematics Part 2: Producing literate and numerate children

Literacy is a complex, multi-faceted concept that changes as society changes. The ability to cope with a wide range of texts requires more than the ability to read the words. It requires a full understanding of the key concepts underpinning … Continue reading

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Mathematics Part 1: The mathematics pendulum

I have long wanted to have Charlotte Wilkinson, an independent mathematics consultant, set out her ideas on mathematics but, in the previous education environment, any association with me would have been dangerous for her work. With that changed, I am … Continue reading

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Here I stand Part 5: Begins with Kathryn Ryan and tricky ERO: ends as the posting that couldn’t be published and a shattering revelation

‘The media, even an outstanding representative like Kathryn Ryan, never gets even close to the heart of it. Below I will describe how, two days ago, Kathryn Ryan was trifled with by the education review office – it was disgraceful … Continue reading

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Here I stand Part 4: The education phenomenon that has had an even more baleful effect on education than the review office

The review office is the major structural reason why primary education is in decline, but there is a phenomenon that has had an even more baleful effect (unsurprisingly, it is directly connected to the review office in function and ideology). … Continue reading

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