Attack! 13 Hattie and feedback: how his appropriation is harming children’s learning

Welcome to ATTACK! 

ATTACK! is a two-page occasional publication giving attention to the curriculum – the holistic curriculum.Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 2.46.24 PM

ATTACK! is for you, also to introduce to your colleagues. Each issue will be restricted to two pages. A cover graphic for a file or folder to store ATTACK! issues is available.

Most of ATTACK! will be concerned with the holistic curriculum which, if acted on, is a fundamental way to undermine the present undemocratic education system. Don’t be discouraged if opportunities to teach holistically are limited, do your best, be a guardian, and act as a witness to this culturally significant and inspiring way of teaching and learning.

To get in touch for comment, questions, and the ATTACK! issues to be sent to you personally:  ksmythe@wave.co.nz

Attack! 13 Hattie and feedback: how his appropriation is harming children’s learning

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One Response to Attack! 13 Hattie and feedback: how his appropriation is harming children’s learning

  1. Roger Young says:

    YES Kelvin you are right on the button.
    And unlike the university boffins and people like Evaluation Associates and the like, you give reasons and evidence to support you statements.
    One of the many things that have made me sceptical is the way that the professional development, usually university lead, has been delivered. The so-called expert researchers would gather the teachers together and say that all our teaching and decisions should be evidence based. Not once did any of them gather evidence from the group being taught to see what they already knew and did. So the experts didn’t gather evidence when telling teachers they had to.
    We were even given a long lesson about making learning intentions clear at the start of each lesson. But the lesson to us about learning intentions didn’t include its own learning intention.

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